Draft – web-based word processing for the non-print world.

Draft is a free web-based word processor with an emphasis on collaboration and version control.

Microsoft Word was created at a time when documents were printed, once for editing and then again the final product. These days many of our documents never leave the digital world and Draft is designed for this work style. It’s assumed that the writing, editing and publishing are all done on-line.

It is Markdown-based of which I’m a huge fan. However, Markdown is intentionally limited in features. This is a good thing since collaborators can quickly learn it. But, Markdown is no replacement for a full-featured word processor.

Files can be imported from Google Drive, Dropbox and others. Documents can also be created via email and sent to Draft. This is a very useful feature that many companies no longer offer.

Draft exports to PDF, Word, HTML and a couple others. Files can be directly published to WordPress, Blogger and more. (Although copy-and-paste seems easier.) Draft also offers a code-your-own publishing option through Webhook which is great for self-hosted sites.

Simply put, it is a very open tool.

Great for collaboration

Perhaps the best feature of Draft is version control. It draws from the coding community where projects become quickly hard to manage when many people are collaborating.

I only tested this process but the concept seems fairly simple. One person owns the master document. She/he sends a link to a collaborator who works on their own copy. The document owner can view and merge the edits as desired. Collaborators must register but only an email is needed.

Since collaborators work on a copy, there is no danger to the master document. Free to edit this page. Click here.

A few small things

Probably the biggest missing feature is a real-time chat mode (as Google Docs does). With all the chat clients available, this is probably not a problem. Draft does allow in-line comments (like Google), which are arguably more useful.

I didn’t encounter any advertisements but the possibility of them in the free version was mentioned.

I was amused by the “Hemingway mode” which disables the backspace key and forces you to keep writing. I doubt I’ll use the feature but it’s what we want our students do in their quick writes.

Draft offers a paid service to get your work edited by real people. (sort of like Uber for English majors, I guess) It’s an interesting financial model and I hope it is successful.

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